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During SFPC’s ten-week intensive program in New York City, we explored interconnected topics daily, including: computation and artistic practice; language design as creative practice; electronics and physical computing; critical theory and philosophy of technology; building the commons; and pedagogy, strategies for learning and teaching. The idea behind these interconnected topics was to build on SFPC’s core curriculum by exploring common ground where we can take the ideas developed in our classroom into the streets and studio. We saw them as platforms to help promote fearless prototyping, asking difficult questions, and creating projects that embody issues that are not yet commonly addressed in the world of art and technology.

Fall 2019 was organized by Zach Lieberman Lauren Gardner and Taeyoon Choi Taeyoon Choi is an artist, educator, and organizer. He is a co-founder of the School for Poetic Computation, an artist-run institution with the motto of “More Poetry, Less Demo!” Taeyoon seeks a sense of gentleness, intellectual kinship, magnanimity, justice and solidarity in his work and collaboration. He has presented installations, performances and workshops at Eyebeam Art and Technology Center, Los Angeles County Museum of Art, New Museum, M+ Museum, Istanbul Design Biennale, Seoul Mediacity Biennale and Venice Biennale for Architecture. He contributed to alternative education such as the Public School New York, Occupy University and Triple Canopy Publication Intensive. He organized Learning to Teach conference with Tega Brain, in partnership with the Processing Foundation. In 2019, Taeyoon worked with Mimi Onuoha to start the New York Tech Zine Fair, with support from Ritu Ghiya and Neta Bomani. He also collaborated with Nabil Hassein and Sonia Boller to organize the Code Ecologies conference about the environmental impact of technology. As a disability justice organizer, Taeyoon continues to work with the Deaf and Disability community towards accessibility and inclusion. . It included classes with American Artist American Artist makes thought experiments that mine the history of technology, race, and knowledge production, beginning with their legal name change in 2013. Their work engages anti-Black state violence, surveillance, and criminalization, such as predictive policing. Artist is a 2022 Creative Capital and United States Artists grantee, and a recipient of the 2021 LACMA Art & Tech Lab Grant. They have exhibited at the Whitney Museum of American Art; MoMA PS1; Studio Museum in Harlem; Museum of Contemporary Art Chicago; Kunsthalle Basel, CH; and Nam June Paik Center, Seoul. They have had solo museum exhibitions at The Queens Museum, New York and The Museum of African Diaspora, California. Their work has been featured in The New York Times, Artforum, and Huffington Post. Artist is a part-time faculty at Parsons, NYU and UCLA and a co-director of the School for Poetic Computation. Zach Lieberman Melanie Hoff As an artist, educator, and organizer, Melanie studies the role that technology plays in social organization and in reinforcing hegemonic structures. They are co-director of the School for Poetic Computation and a founding member of Hex House and the Cybernetics Library. Melanie strives to cultivate spaces of learning and feeling that encourage honesty and reconciliation for the ways we are shaped by systems of gender, racialization, class, and the trauma these systems inscribe upon our bodies. Todd Anderson Todd Anderson is a digital poet, software artist and educator based in New York City. He has been making experimental software art for over 10 years including the live interactive poetry project Hotwriting, the Chrome Extension ARG 'An Experience', the performance-inside-the-browser extension HitchHiker, and a multiple plays and performances with the multidisciplinary group H0t Club. He is a co-director of the School for Poetic Computation and one of the organizers of Babycastles, a video game gallery and event space in NYC. He is perhaps best known as the host and curator of WordHack, the monthly language+technology talk series running every third Thursday at Babycastles (and online) since 2014. Celine Wong Katzman Celine Wong Katzman is Curator at Rhizome and serves as one of seven co-directors at the School for Poetic Computation. Previously she was a NYSCA Curatorial Fellow at the Queens Museum. Celine is committed to supporting creative practitioners experimenting with new media, particularly those who engage in a thoughtful and community-oriented approach. Her writing appears in publications such as The Nation, Art in America, Rhizome, as well as in the New Museum's exhibition catalog, The Art Happens Here: Net Art's Archival Poetics and Paper Monument's Best! Letters from Asian Americans in the arts. She holds a B.A. in Visual Art with honors from Brown University. Lauren Gardner Taeyoon Choi Taeyoon Choi is an artist, educator, and organizer. He is a co-founder of the School for Poetic Computation, an artist-run institution with the motto of “More Poetry, Less Demo!” Taeyoon seeks a sense of gentleness, intellectual kinship, magnanimity, justice and solidarity in his work and collaboration. He has presented installations, performances and workshops at Eyebeam Art and Technology Center, Los Angeles County Museum of Art, New Museum, M+ Museum, Istanbul Design Biennale, Seoul Mediacity Biennale and Venice Biennale for Architecture. He contributed to alternative education such as the Public School New York, Occupy University and Triple Canopy Publication Intensive. He organized Learning to Teach conference with Tega Brain, in partnership with the Processing Foundation. In 2019, Taeyoon worked with Mimi Onuoha to start the New York Tech Zine Fair, with support from Ritu Ghiya and Neta Bomani. He also collaborated with Nabil Hassein and Sonia Boller to organize the Code Ecologies conference about the environmental impact of technology. As a disability justice organizer, Taeyoon continues to work with the Deaf and Disability community towards accessibility and inclusion. Tsige Tafesse Tiri Kananuruk Bangkok-born, New York-based Tiri Kananuruk is a performance artist and researcher. Her work explores the manipulation of sound in the context of technological consumerism, examining human relationships through the use of transmitted signals, natural language processing, and bodily movement. She holds a BA in Exhibition Design from Chulalongkorn University in Bangkok, and a Master in Interactive Telecommunications from Tisch School of the Arts at New York University. Her work has been shown internationally at venues including The National Gallery of Singapore; ATT19, Bangkok, Thailand; RÝMD, Reykjavík, Iceland; Network Music Festival UK; Elecktron, Estonia; 856G, Cebu, Philippines; Currents New Media, New Mexico; Cycling '74 Expo, Massachusetts; Culture Hub, Roulette Intermedium, Judson Memorial Church, The Immigrant Artist Biennial, and Media Art Exploration, New York. Tiri has lectured at the University of the Arts in Philadelphia and the School for Poetic Computation. She is currently an adjunct professor at Open Arts, New York University. She was a new media artist resident at Mana Contemporary (2019), and CultureHub New York (2020). She is a member of NUUM collective along with Mimi Yin, NiNi Dongnier, Nuntinee Tansrisakul, and Yuguang Zhang. She is a co-founder of MORAKANA along with Sebastián Morales. Alex Miller Alex Miller is an artist, programmer and teacher. In his creative practice under the name SPACEFILLER, he focuses on low fidelity simulations with emergent, naturalistic behavior. He uses these systems to build installations or audiovisual performances. Sebastián Morales Prado Sebastián Morales Prado is a Mexican artist, engineer, and researcher based in New York. His practice develops interactive works hybridizing robotics, digital culture, and living systems. Sebastian is the co-founder of MORAKANA among with Tiri Kananuruk, they exhibited and performed at The National Gallery of Singapore as part of the exhibition Novel Ways of Being, the Gwangju Media Art Platform in Korea, and CultureHub in New York. Sebastian has spoken at conferences including Radical Networks, and ArtTech Forum in Venice, Italy. He has lectured at CUNY, UArts , and SFPC. Sebastian was an artist in residence at Autodesk Pier 9 (2015), a New Media Artist resident at Mana Contemporary (2018), and Research Fellow at the ITP at NYU (2018). Stefan Pelikan and Fern Ramallo .

Details

Date
September 30, 2019 to December 6, 2019
Location
New York City, NY
Cost
$6000 Scholarships available learn more...
Deadline
Applications closed on June 27, 2019

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Expectations

  • Students will have full access to the space to work on projects.
  • Teachers and mentors are readily available for technical, conceptual, and artistic guidance. Peer to peer collaboration was highly encouraged among students.
  • Acceptance into the session is an invitation to join the SFPC community. Full-time participation during the ten weeks is mandatory. This also means you come prepared to all of the classes, do the homework, and engage with the community.
  • We expect our students to be in the school between 10am–5pm, Monday to Friday. Read our Participate page for more information.
  • It’s also expected that you work openly — sharing what you learn along the way and collaborating with your peers. The success of the session for the group is dependent on engaged participation throughout the term. By participating you will be actively shaping an emerging culture of open source and transparent education.

Accessibility

Our programs are conducted in spoken English with audiovisual materials such as slides, code examples and video.

Please take care and be well. We hope you are comfortable in your housing, living, and working situation in general. Never hesitate to ask us for advice and reach out if you have accessibility requests or need any assistance during your time at SFPC. We will work closely with you towards co-creating the most accommodating learning environment for your needs.

reach out with questions about access...

How do I apply?

Apply Now

Applications open until Applications closed on June 27, 2019.

You can expect to hear back from us about the status of your application on July 15, 2019. Please email us at admissions@sfpc.study with any questions you have.

more about what we look for in participants...

How much does it cost to attend?

For classes, it costs $6000 + processing fees, for a one-time payment. We also offer payment plans. Participants can schedule weekly or monthly payments of the same amount. First and last payments must be made before the start and end of class. *Processing fees apply for each payment.

SFPC processes all payments via Withfriends and Stripe. Please email admissions@sfpc.study if these payment options don't work for you.

Upon payment, your space in the class will be reserved. We offer scholarships for those who cannot pay full tuition. Read more about scholarships below.

I can’t pay for SFPC. Can I come at a reduced rate, or for free?

If you can’t pay full tuition, we really still want you to apply. Our application will ask you how much you can pay. We will offer subsidized positions in all of our classes, once each one has enough participants enrolled that we’re able to do so.

We have also started a scholarship fund, and we will be offering additional scholarships as community members redistribute their wealth through SFPC. We direct scholarship funds towards participants who are low-income, Black, Indigenous, racialized, gendered, disabled, Queer, trans, oppressed, historicially excluded and underrepresented.

Right now, tuition is SFPC’s main source of income, and that is a problem. It means that we can only pay teachers, pay for space, and organize programs when participants pay full tuition to attend. Tuition is a huge barrier to entry into the SFPC community, and it disproportionately limits Black participants, indigenous participants, queer and trans participants, and other people who are marginalized, from participating. Scholarships are not a long term solution for us, but in the short and medium term we hope to offer them more while we work towards transforming SFPC’s financial model.

How can I help others to attend SFPC?

For SFPC to be the kind of place the community has always meant it to be, it needs to become a platform for wealth redistribution. If you are a former participant, prospective participant, or friend of the school, and you have the financial privilege to do so, please donate generously. There is enough wealth in this community to make sure no one is ever rejected because of their inability to pay, and becoming that school will make SFPC the impactful, imaginative, transformative center of poetry and justice that we know it can be.

What if I can’t go, can I get a refund?

  • Yes, we can give you 100% refund up to 10 days before class starts
  • 50% refund after 10 days, until the first day of the class
  • No refunds can be given after the first day of the class

Interested in more learning opportunities at the School for Poetic Computation? Join our newsletter to stay up to date on future sessions and events, and follow us on Instagram and Twitter. Support our programming through scholarships. Get in touch over email.